Wednesday, April 29, 2009

Should Judge Jay Bybee take the blame for the CIA's rough interrogation tactics?


Should Judge Jay Bybee be the fall guy for the CIA's rough interrogation tactics of terror suspects? Yesterday, Time Magazine wrote an article describing Bybee as a "top Justice Department official who approved an array of so-called "enhanced interrogation techniques" against alleged al-Qaeda members that many observers call torture." The article continues; "though Bybee wasn't the only person responsible for crafting the Bush administration's interrogation policy, unlike his erstwhile colleagues he continues to hold public office, sitting on the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. He now faces calls for impeachment from Sen. Patrick Leahy, former Obama aide John Podesta and the New York Times editorial board, among other corners. The Justice Department has distanced itself from much of Bybee's work and is reportedly preparing a scathing internal report that could call for him and others to be reprimanded or even disbarred."

DISBARRED? DISBARRED!? All these talking heads keep saying that Bybee has broken both International and U.S. laws but SHOW ME what laws he has broken. I've looked and I can't find a single law of the United States that he broke. Each of the U.S. laws that I've read only proscribe penalties to the person who actually did the "torturing". Let's be honest the Bush administration was going to interrogate terror suspects anyway they wanted, regardless of what their lawyers told them. Additionally, are we really going to "reprimand" or "disbar" a United States Circuit Judge over the "standards" of an international treaty? Give me a break! Our country signs a treaty a day that we don't abide by. Why start now? And with a Federal Judge?

The fact of the matter is, politics are more important to some of our leaders then keeping this country safe.

Bybee received his B.A., from Brigham Young University in 1977, graduating magna cum laude. He went on to receive his Juris Doctorate from BYU's J. Reuben Clark School of Law three years later. He served his mission for the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints in Chile from 1973- 1975.