Unpopular religions at home and abroad

John F. of the popular Mormon blog By Common Consent wrote earlier this week on the German government’s treatment of certain religious denominations as dangerous or extremist groups. The main target currently seems to be Scientologists, which corresponds with similar hostility in the U.S. and other countries. John F. quotes statements by German officials calling Scientology a “dangerous” and “antidemocratic organisation” that pursues “totalitarian goals.”

Like John F., I get a little nervous when groups like Scientology come under fire. It is all to easy to imagine the same rhetoric and tactics turned on other minority religions. (I realize there are good arguments that Scientology doesn’t constitute a religion, but for the purposes of the First Amendment it does.) Last year when the group “Anonymous” began its campaign against Scientologists worldwide, I couldn’t help cringing. Most of the criticisms aimed at Scientology could also apply to Jehova’s Witnesses, Seventh-Day Adventists, Mormons, and any other minority religion. And because Scientologists weren’t popular with the press or mainstream Christians, this campaign of intimidation, cyber-crime, and copyright infringement was tacitly condoned by most people.

Jeff F. points out that the only reason Mormons in Germany haven’t been subject to the same treatment as Scientolgists and Jehova’s Witnesses is because they are marginally less unpopular. I think the same could be said of campaigns like Anonymous — they haven’t targeted Mormons only because other groups are less popular. And in the wake of Proposition 8, I see the fortunes of the Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints growing worse rather than better in the near future.

I should note that the Anonymous campaign is significantly different from the actions of the German government, in that it is private action rather than state action. The First Amendment is designed to protect religious groups and their beliefs, even unpopular ones, from governmental interference. But religious groups are supposed to enjoy similar protections in Germany under the German Constitution and Article 10 of the European Charter of Fundamental Rights. Other countries such as Canada have also treated religious and political minorities unequally despite constitutional and governmental laws to the contrary. The protections afforded to religious groups in America have been on the decline ever since the 1990 Supreme Court Case Employment Division v. Smith . It isn’t hard to imagine the U.S. government engaging in similar discrimination under the guise of national security or equality.

1 thought on “Unpopular religions at home and abroad”

  1. This is a very interesting subject that I think will become more important in the future. There is such a fine line between free speech and a government’s need to protect its citizens. I think that whenever either the government or groups begin operating on the far extremes of the subject that the real problems occur.

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